Revival

Giselle

Summary

Choreography by _Patrice Bart_ after _Coralli_ and _Perrot_\Music by _Adolphe Adam_
Choreography by Patrice Bart after Coralli and Perrot
Music by Adolphe Adam
Choreography by Patrice Bart after Coralli and Perrot
Music by Adolphe Adam
Choreography by Patrice Bart after Coralli and Perrot
Music by Adolphe Adam
Choreography by Patrice Bart after Coralli and Perrot
Music by Adolphe Adam
Choreography by Patrice Bart after Coralli and Perrot
Music by Adolphe Adam
Choreography by Patrice Bart after Coralli and Perrot
Music by Adolphe Adam
Choreography by Patrice Bart after Coralli and Perrot
Music by Adolphe Adam
Choreography by Patrice Bart after Coralli and Perrot
Music by Adolphe Adam
Choreography by Patrice Bart after Coralli and Perrot
Music by Adolphe Adam
Choreography by Patrice Bart after Coralli and Perrot
Music by Adolphe Adam
Choreography by Patrice Bart after Coralli and Perrot
Music by Adolphe Adam

Love and betrayal – these are the great themes of Giselle, still one of the masterpieces of the Romantic ballet repertoire. The peasant girl Giselle not only loves dancing but also the nobleman Albrecht, who conceals his true identity from her. The young man courts her, even though he is already promised to another. When Giselle learns the truth, she loses her mind and dies. After her death, she is accepted into the community of the Wilis, supernatural beings who, like Giselle, died as brides before their weddings. Together with her companions, Giselle is condemned to seduce men into dancing until they die of exhaustion. Myrtha, the Queen of the Wilis, watches over this. Albrecht also comes into the forest to visit Giselle’s grave.

The desire to depict ghostly floating fairy beings on stage inspired choreographers in the 19th century, first in Paris, to literally elevate ballet en pointe. In mostly eerie settings, dancing elves and fairies roamed – in the ballet Giselle, it’s the dance-addicted Wilis around whom the libretto revolves. In homage to the grand French tradition from which he himself hails, Patrice Bart has created a version closely based on the original choreography by Jean Coralli and Jules Perrot, while also expressing the freshness and timelessness of the language of Romantic ballet. Peter Farmer’s stage design also reflects the aesthetics of this tradition. Patrice Bart‘s Giselle premiered at the Staatsoper Unter den Linden in 2000.

Dates

2024
2024






Info

Staatsoper Unter den Linden
7:30 pm
2 h 20 min incl. one intermission
Introduction 45 minutes before curtain.
Staatsoper Unter den Linden
7:30 pm
2 h 20 min incl. one intermission
8 – 27
Introduction 45 minutes before curtain.
Staatsoper Unter den Linden
7:30 pm
2 h 20 min incl. one intermission
7 – 12
Introduction 45 minutes before curtain.
Staatsoper Unter den Linden
7:30 pm
2 h 20 min incl. one intermission
Introduction 45 minutes before curtain.
Staatsoper Unter den Linden
7:30 pm
2 h 20 min incl. one intermission
Introduction 45 minutes before curtain.
Staatsoper Unter den Linden
3:00 pm
2 h 20 min incl. one intermission
Introduction 45 minutes before curtain.
Staatsoper Unter den Linden
7:30 pm
2 h 20 min incl. one intermission
Introduction 45 minutes before curtain.
Staatsoper Unter den Linden
7:30 pm
2 h 20 min incl. one intermission
Introduction 45 minutes before curtain.
Staatsoper Unter den Linden
7:30 pm
2 h 20 min incl. one intermission
Introduction 45 minutes before curtain.
Staatsoper Unter den Linden
7:30 pm
2 h 20 min incl. one intermission
Introduction 45 minutes before curtain.
Staatsoper Unter den Linden
7:30 pm
2 h 20 min incl. one intermission
Introduction 45 minutes before curtain.
Family performance

13.00

5

Family workshop

To prepare the visit to the opera, participants are introduced to the plot as well as important characters, and they also rehearse short dance scenes. Valid only in combination with a visit to a family performance.

 
Registration required

Tel: 030 34 384-166
E-mail: contact@tanz-ist-klasse.de

To Die Beautifully: An Aesthetics of Transience

Column

In the backdrop of artistic creation, death plays a significant role. From dramatic theater plays to lavish opera performances, the motif of stage death is the pivot of countless productions. Often, it's the classical conflict that drives the plot forward: a love triangle, a thwarted or impossible love leading to rivalry and revenge, despair, madness, or suicide.


In opera, death fills the scenery with its own musical language. But even in ballet, death is staged in a unique way. Here, in classical ballet, it is portrayed not only as a tragic figure but above all as an aesthetic expression. Ballet infuses death with an almost tangible liveliness while simultaneously exploring the fragility of life and the deep emotions that accompany it, as seen in Anna Pavlova's interpretation of Mikhail Fokin's choreography of the Dying Swan. Ballet not only harnesses the expressive power of dance but also the artistic design of costumes, especially the iconic tutu, to enhance the portrayal of death. The transparent white, calf-length, so-called romantic tutu originated in the 19th century and became indispensable on the dance stage with the invention of the pointe shoe and pointe technique. During this time, theater sets were increasingly illuminated with gas lights and the first electric lamps, allowing for the play of light and shadow, with the transparency of semi-transparent curtains inspiring illusionistic representations. This mystical backdrop, where the tutu appeared almost like a floating veil, not only fueled the audience's imagination but also inspired librettists, composers, directors, and set designers in the Romantic era. The transparency and lightness of the tutu intensified the effect by creating the impression that the dancer was literally floating through space – a sensation reminiscent of ghosts or supernatural beings. It underscored the aesthetics of death or a supernatural appearance, such as that of ghosts, fairies, or other spiritual beings.

In this cultural context, death was no longer viewed as the ultimate event but rather understood as an aesthetic concept connecting human finitude with the beyond. In the ballet Giselle, love itself leads to death. The aestheticization of death manifested as a cultural tendency in various artistic expressions, including classical ballet. It unfolded not only as a central question on stage but also as an existential question of real life in the 19th century.

Quoted from the Ballet Paper No. 2, author: Katja Wiegand